Sutra I.1 – Chapter I, Sutra 1

अथ योगानुशासनम् ॥१॥

atha yoganusasanam

The Yoga Sutras were written in Sanskrit, a complex and multi-layered language, offering several layers of interpretation. In its crudest form, this sutra translates as “Now begins the authoritative instruction on Yoga”. As we reveal more sutras, it will become clear that this first sutra is in fact a summary of the other 194.

PRACTICAL LIVING     Beyond that though, the word “atha” is profound: it talks about commitment. Commitment to what we are doing NOW. Are you reading this blog, watching TV, talking on skype and texting all at the same time? It talks about paying attention to what you’re about to do, to what you commit to doing, whether it’s studying the sutras, having a cup of coffee with a friend or doing the dishes…How annoying is it to be having lunch with a friend who is half engaged in your conversation and half engaged in texting? “Yoga” here refers to the link that happens when we commit to something. A relationship between you and something else occurs – between two people, between you and your work, your pet, your SELF. How committed are you to your partner, friends, family? “anusasanam” says that what counts is action! We can read and intellectually understand many beautiful concepts, but if we are not acting on them, we are not doing Yoga. Yoga is transformational because it requires action – change requires action. How much information have you acquired and how much of that have you implemented? In summary: commit – connect – act.

IN THE YOGA WORLD     In Yoga, the word “atha” is powerful, it’s a blessing to a new beginning and related to commitment to several things: commitment to studying the teachings, to a guided reflection (traditionally from a Yoga teacher), to changing our habits (samskaras), to self-transformation. It’s the commitment that both the teacher and the student both make to each other. “atha” also represents the student here. The student who is humble, accepting that the guided reflection is necessary, that they are uncomfortable and want help, that these teachings have been transmitted from teacher to student for thousands of years. “atha” is a commitment to facing the discomfort, looking at it, and then making the necessary changes. Since every teacher is a student also, “atha” includes everyone studying and teaching Yoga. “yoga” then becomes the beautiful link between the student and the teacher. A link of trust, of friendliness, of growth and respect. The relationship with the right teacher helps take you from heaviness to lightness, from darkness to light. This link refers to the teachings – the profound relationship that we begin to develop with these ancient teachings. “anusasanam” then refers to the teacher. A teacher also needs the commitment: commitment to their own practice, to their own teacher, and now to the student in front of them. A teacher receives the teachings, filters them through his/her own experiences and then teaches them as is appropriate to the individual student. The sutras are filled with tools that we will explore. Tools that allow us to act.

INSPIRATIONAL PERSON     
This man, let’s call him Nate, symbolizes commitment to me. In the years I have known him, what he decides to do, he does. The 3 steps this sutra talks about: commitment – connection – action describe his life pretty accurately. He is a man who will walk across Spain rain or shine, food or no food, roof or no roof. He will change careers regardless of the hoops he has to jump or the personal challenges that arise. He will spend a day teaching a friend how to ride her bike. He will build a geodesic dome for an art festival from scratch. He will give you his undivided attention if he said he would do so. Thank you Nate for showing me the meaning of this sutra!

What are you committed to? Please interact as much as you like – everyone will learn from your personal experiences!

Thanks and we will define “yoga” next week!

149 thoughts on “Sutra I.1 – Chapter I, Sutra 1

  1. My father once teased me for a habit of mine: committing to a task or an idea for about 80% effort or time – I suppose 80% means somewhere inside that I have proven to myself that I *can* do something, but by the time the 80% rolls around, I am already on to the next thing.

    Once he said that, I saw this in all areas of my life, from mundane tasks to larger goals.

    I consider myself a very focused person, but I now make a concerted effort to follow all of those things I have started to their conclusion, and to give them the attention they deserve.

    So, now, yoga, I am ready to commit to you, and to act on this commitment all the way through.🙂

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  3. I would consider myself a committed and focused person, because I have generally been able to achieve the goals I set out to do—whether passing a major exam, graduating, traveling, landing a “good” job, or moving to a different state. People have even complimented me by saying the things I have done are not things everyone can do. Despite this, I am guilty of overcommitting and multitasking in an effort to get everything done, right now. I also have many different interests that I want to explore…flamenco, sailing, acoyoga, road trips, country music, kirtan, the list goes on and on….and I am also guilty of wanting to do all these things at the same time because hey, life is short and I hate being bored. Multitasking is an important skill, but I see now how it has created stress and a lack of inner peace in my life. I was struck by the diagram Lucia shared in our first weekend together of how we let our prana get away from us (arrows pointing away from the body) in a million ways everyday—but rushing to finish something, inwardly criticizing people in our minds, letting little things upset us, and not taking the time to care for ourselves by doing too much. That’s why I am enjoying keeping the prana journal—it reminds me to take time for myself each day, and that my life is my own and under my control. My mantra this week has been to “keep prana inside,” just like in the diagram with the arrows pointing toward the body. Keeping prana inside to me means letting go, even of things which interest me, if it means that I will be unable to focus on the tasks at hand. Right now I have decided to focus on only three things instead of ten things: preparing to take the bar exam in July, participating in the CSOY TT, and working full-time. This has meant making small sacrifices so that I will have enough time and energy to study, such as not going to a friend’s party, not dating, staying inside when the weather is nice, getting to work early so I can leave early, and going to bed early. I am also practicing yoga at home rather than in group classes to save time and money. In sum, I am committed to this period of growth and self-reflection where I am totally focused on myself, and I am very curious to see where I am in six months when TT is complete.

    • It os fascinating indeed to see where our prana goes. The first step on this sutra, commitment, calls for awareness. And it sounds like you’re committed to being more aware🙂 Though we put effort into our ‘practices’, remember they should also feel enjoyable. I also look forward to seeing the changes!

  4. This Sutra highlights for me the importance of being present in your life by not allowing yourself to skate through the moments in your life. I can see in my own life that whenever I’ve committed, connected and acted I felt truly alive.

  5. This sutra is rightfully 1 of 195. I am self-confessed multi-tasker… and sometimes that just doesn’t do anybody justice. As I’m making a work list, I am texting a friend, emailing about another project, contemplating what yoga class to hit soon, and trying to stay a few steps ahead of my current supervisor so things move slowly. WHY do I do this? I’m retain every expectation set for me by others. I have to be the great artist, the great organizer, the great friend, the great yogi… this is exhausting. My FEAR of disappointing others directly relates to mad mad multitasking.

    But as I’ve found, I can approach tasks with a steadier pace. When it comes time to be the artist, I set down the phone and I create. When I need to be the organizer, I shut down the Netflix, and I am a spreadsheet-making machine. The great friend grabs a snack and plops on the couch to listen, and the great yogi allows himself to push away ALL distractions and read the yoga texts for TT. It may be physically and mentally impossible to be the master of all of these facets at once, but a damn good start is committing to one “identity” at a time and rocking it out. If for one day I commit to being a great friend and yogi, I can lay in bed at night and be proud of those actions. That well-deserved pride is so stimulating and so peaceful that it ca vanquish any fear of disappointment. One solid, grounded step at a time. Namaste.

    • Thank you for the beautiful examples Chris. Yes, yoga is a process. To a large extent, it’s a process of re-training ourselves to do things differently. And it can only go one day at a time🙂

  6. Commitment to me is as important as it is big. I am very committed to being there for my mother. Even more so when she was diagnosed with Breast Cancer five years ago. Ever since – I have made sure she is taken care of. No matter the task, I feel she comes first. If it’s yard work, helping plan something, buying something she needs or taking her anywhere – My mother is my commitment.

    • Your comment about your mother brought a huge smile to my face. It sounds like you’re very committed to her. The quality of our relationships reflects our inner state, so committing to this relationship sounds like a great way to work on yourself in addition to making someone else’s life even more incredible🙂

  7. I indeed am one of the guilty multi-taskers of the world. I’ve often told myself that it is inevitable, that there has been a shift in society where while the world is at my fingertips. Emails are expected to be returned quickly, texts immediately, every tv show you would want to watch is “on demand”. Recently through my yoga journey I have come to realize that when you are doing more than one thing at a time, you are not doing either tasks well. I have become aware of the times when I am performing multiple tasks and cognizant that am not fully committed to either. While I am still not perfect, I am slowly requiring myself to commit to my actions. Whether it be something as small as putting my cell away and out of site, or as big as setting aside time each day for self-reflection. I can feel myself become lighter and more at peace with my daily actions when they are performed with full commitment.

  8. The word commitment to me is both selfish and selfless. We spend so much of our lives committing to others – to our parents, to our children, our lovers, our friends, our jobs. Giving pieces of ourselves to the other commitments in our lives. I don’t mean this to be negative but rather shed light into how consuming commitment can be to better others. Commitment to me is also selfish – committing to “me” time, committing to my yoga practice, committing to furthering my career. Both sides of the word hold positive connotations in what I am giving out and what I am receiving.

    • Katie, everything we do can be perceived as either selfish or selfless, like you mentioned. Commitment in yoga is an ingredient required to transform. It does not need to carry a heavy weight with it. Commitment is simply choosing to focus on something for an extended period of time, and hopefully we are choosing things that help us change🙂

  9. I am learning so much, everyday, that’s one of my missions in Life. However, these past (exact!) 5 weeks here in India taking care of baby Gaia teaches me something new, and one of them is the commitment and being present with her, that you’ve mentioned in this Sutra. Thank you baby Gaia for allowing me into your Life, for giggling and literally Laughing Out Loud, when I say: “let’s go to sleep, now?” Thank you Life and Sister for allowing me into your Life and taking care of your illuminated baby. I am grateful for having you, Nate and BG in my life. It means so much to me and I feel that I am (daily) a better person. Weeklysutra.com is also an example of this Sutra.❤ Love, Light and Joy, Meka xx

    • Meka, I am beyond gratitude for your commitment to us in India. It was beautiful and rich experience for all of us! And yes, a baby helps us in the yoga path – we need to be present and focused on them. She has become my new little teacher🙂 Love you!

  10. I am very committed to my students. I teach at an elementary school full time. I feel a sense of guilt if I do not devote 100% of my attention to my students when they are in the room. I think part of that guilt comes from feeling that I am not giving them the best education possible or that I am not doing my best work at my job. I am not saying that I am able to give 100% all the time but I think my work is probably where I do commit the most.

    When reflecting on this it made me reevaluate how I spend my time when I am not with my students. If someone had asked me if I was committed to my husband, family, and friends I would have said “100%.” Yet, I am that person that will be reading an email or watching TV while also on the phone listening to my loved one. I never do this at work. So, maybe I need to focus on my role as a wife, daughter, sister, best friend, etc. I think this redirection may help me to find a better commitment to my loved ones and to myself as well.

    • Beautiful insight SASIYogi! Yes, it’s the people closest to us that we can practice yoga with. They are mirrors that help us evolve. That is why many yoga teachers would ask their students to go and have a family – because it’s through relationships that we can grow and change.

  11. I am very committed to my students. I teach at an elementary school full time. I feel a sense of guilt if I do not devote 100% of my attention to my students when they are in the room. I think part of that guilt comes from feeling that I am not giving them the best education possible or that I am not doing my best work at my job. I am not saying that I am able to give 100% all the time but I think my work is probably where I do commit the most.

    When reflecting on this it made me reevaluate how I spend my time when I am not with my students. If someone had asked me if I was committed to my husband, family, and friends I would have said “100%.” Yet, I am that person that will be reading an email or watching TV while also on the phone listening to my loved one. I never do this at work. So, maybe I need to focus on my role as a wife, daughter, sister, best friend, etc. I think this redirection may help me to find a better commitment to my loved ones and to myself as well.

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  13. Before starting the training course, i kept asking myself: Am i ready for this? Or what am i doing here (do i have enough on my plate already?). So, i am really questioning my intention, skill and level of commitment. However, when i went to bed at night, another voice in me kept telling me if i don’t commit now, i will never be able to commit; almost like it’s now or never, dont procrastinate as i am getting older. Also, i heard it once (and dont remember who told me, it could be from my previous yoga teacher) that “when you are ready, a teach is there”….So, here i am, ready for a new chapter of my life, finding out more about my true self upon self-reflecting and clearing up the muggy cloud in me. Vamos! Let’s kickoff fall season with some atha: atha yoganusasanam , om shantishantishanti…

    • Troy, your commitment throughout teacher training was admirable. I believe the saying goes something like “when the student is ready, the teacher appears”. You were ready, we showed up🙂 Now, when other students are ready, you will show up in their lives!

  14. I love that the first sutra begins with an emphasis on commitment because that has been the action I have bounced back and forth debating whether I am ready to bring Yoga into the forefront of my life. Many people commenting on this first sutra also speak of this “readiness” with an uncertainty. This first sutra teaches us that it is not about whether we know enough or are flexible enough, it is simply about commitment. The first sutra also emphasizes the “union” aspect of Yoga. Until now, I have felt that undertaking a new chapter with Yoga would be an isolating experience, forcing me to work on myself and connect more deeply with my higher power. However, as I learn more about the “union” aspect of Yoga, i realize that it is not isolating at all. I have teachers and peers who have traveled a very similar journey. As I commitment myself to Yoga, I must work on being more open to the union with others who can teach me amazing things.

    • CurbyCrt, you touch a very important aspect that Yoga talks about: relationships. Commitment is very important, absolutely. But others can help us (a) stay committed; and (b) evolve as human beings.

  15. Now it begins. I am so new to the world of yoga. This Sutra, is one of so many tiny lights that has switched on in my head since the journey began. I am taking a six month hiatus from the world of restaurant management, which I have been married to for more than ten years, and I have the privilege of being able to fully commit myself to my studies. The first and most significant commitment, of course is to myself and my journey. When I sat down to read yesterday, I just sat and read. This sounds so simple, but I come from a large family and generally spread myself between tasks, people, even thoughts. I am committed to my garden. I spend a little time everyday connecting with the earth. It is very easy for a garden to become overridden with weeds or to dry out. I am committed to my wonderful relationship. I have cooked a few nights this past week. I tried to think about just that. The smells, the steam, the vegetables from my garden. Then, when it came time to sit and talk and share time to my closest friend and love…that is exactly what I did.

  16. Over the course of the teacher training program I’ve been experiencing, truly my ability to stay connected in the present moment (atha) has increased dramatically. Not only do I no longer walking through life in a fuzzy daze, but also my memory has improved as well. Staying in tune with where you are in life allows you to not only appreciate life much more, and to remember more of the smaller things. As far as commitment goes, I really need to commit myself to my personal, physical yoga practice. Life’s chaos has made me let go of something I truly enjoy.

    • Gigi, you’ve described some of the amazing benefits of consistent practice. And when we realize that we are not as consistent as we would like to, we stop, reflect and make a change. And we do this over and over again – it’s a practice!

  17. Hey there, just starting the yoga journey as a true participant. Part of the journey in the teacher training has been to have a study buddy. That has been the hardest part because it requires action. It requires commitment to focus on getting together despite everything else that can get in the way. Fortunately my study buddy stands firm in her journey and commitment and we just had our first study buddy session. It was awakening, it was connecting it was informative and fun. The commitment to making time for the study buddy, taking it to action and being open to learning and sharing this journey is going to be the difference for me in being a passive observer to the active participant. Thank you study buddy, and thank you Lucia for knowing this is what we need…. 🙂

  18. I am both committed and uncommitted it seems. I love to take on something new, but there are definitely times my commitments fail as time wears on and maybe something isn`t as exciting as it was when it was new. I become bored and move on to the next thing. I am committed to teacher training as yoga has proven to be something I haven`t gotten bored with in the 10 years I`ve been practicing and I never get tired of talking about the benefits it`s brought to my life. The connections with my awesome small group of peers and guidance from Lucia will help keep me engaged and committed as I carry out the action of participating in the teacher training course.

  19. Yoga is my way to be committed to myself and to my new goal. My old habits, life’s chores do get in the way. Now it is the time to truly prioritize my goals and get into action…read, practice, breath and live Yoga. The benefits are endless for myself, children, family and friends. I am thrilled and nervous in the same time to be part of the teacher training program. I do have to step up and finally follow through my visions. It is time to grow for me on many levels.

  20. Commit-Connect-Do….love this! Parenting has its challenging moments and I find myself doing just this. If I am lacking in something it takes recognition for me to commit to change something. Connect with my child and then act on what that need is!

  21. I love the order of commit, then connect and then do. I am so committed to all my family. I am so connected with my family, I feel, because my commitment is so strong to them. And so they know that whatever they need I will do for them. It’s an unspoken commitment and a strong bond.

  22. When I first began yoga I was so excited and overly eager to learn more. I immediately signed up for a year-long teacher training and got all the way to month two. Then life got in the way. A very accommodating woman told me I could work at my own pace and turn in my assignments “whenever”. Then I never turned in another assignment. Obviously I hadn’t fully committed. Over a over decade has gone by. With greater self-awareness, I am ready to commit. So here it is, a public declaration of my commitment to the study of yoga.

  23. This sutra is something I have been working to achieve more of in my life. I am a busy bee and tend to have at least 5 major things going on in my life at a time. Because of this I tend to multitask (it doesn’t help that I am also a procrastinator). Everything I choose to throw myself into is just an action that helps connect me to a much larger commitment. Now I am learning to fully focus on all these smaller steps. For me this means forgetting about everything going on with one project while I am working on another and focusing all of my attention just on what is in front of me.

  24. This sutra demonstrates the power of simplicity. It is such a simple statement, yet it has so much depth.

    To me, this sutra marks the beginning of the yoga journey- the moment that the student’s inner light bulb flicks on. I am reminded of a quote that I’ve held dear for many years now: “Leap and the net will appear” – John Burroughs.

    I’ve always been the type of individual who makes a decision and goes for it, regardless of how much thought I’ve put into it, and I deal with the details and setbacks when I’ve arrived. This is in stark contrast to many other close friends of mine, who intensely analyze the entire process and can visualize the beginning, middle, and end goal. Regardless of the strategy to get to where you want to be, this sutra is beautiful because it lends a warm hand to everyone, no matter what point of life that they are in.

    Commitment has always been a personal strength of mine- but the commitment to a personal yoga practice is one of the most important things an individual can do for themselves. It has the power to change the entire course of your life- and that is an incredibly daunting idea to consider. The net will appear whenever the individual is ready- and this first sutra is the welcome mat.

  25. In the past 5 years, my ability to commit has changed incredibly. I moved to Chicago 5 years ago to attend grad school. Prior to that, I was committed. I would work hard and totally immerse myself in everything I was doing – whether that’s work, family, friends, fun, etc. When I started grad school I noticed a change. I couldn’t quite commit to anything anymore. I was involved in a program that was frustrating and was lacking in several areas. By the end of my degree, I was tired, exhausted, I was coasting through life because that’s all I could physically and emotionally do. Once I graduated, nothing changed. For the past 18 months since graduation I’ve felt the same lack of commitment. It’s almost like I don’t even know who I am anymore. I give up easily and I set myself up for failure. The most frustrating thing is I don’t care if I fail anymore. That is completely unlike me. I’ve wanted to do CSOY Teacher Training for over 3 years. I finally made the commitment to do it. I was nervous. It was a huge commitment – At this point I’m not even 100% sure what exactly this commitment will look like. As I jotted down the training dates in my planner I noticed something. Almost every weekend conflicted with something in my life. Someone’s birthday, work event, etc etc. As I entered into teacher training, I knew I would have to sacrifice and tell people no so I could focus on me and something I’ve wanted to do for years. It’s only after my first weekend in teacher training that I have truly reconnected with the concept of commitment. We’ll see what these next few months have in store, but I’m committed to seeing this through. Commitment – Connection – Action . . . atha yoganusasanam

    • Kristin, thank you for sharing. Like you said, you know what commitment looks like. Tap into “committed Kristin”, remember how good it felt to start and finish things. And yes, when we commit, we will need to say “no” to things that interfere with out commitments. Be committed to self-compassion as well🙂

  26. I believe “commit” is a beautiful word. It implies putting all your attention and your love into whatever you are committing to, but heck how difficult I find it. Even while I am typing this I have 3 other tabs open and my mind is wandering remembering what happened this morning and what I am going to do this afternoon. But you know what, I have experienced that bliss and that peace of mind that comes when I really care about the task I am doing. I love those days in which I leave the office knowing that I got done everything that I could get done, when I work out and I did my best, when I hang out with my friends and enjoy every bit of our conversation, when I am reading and I feel I am fighting that dragon with the warrior in my novel. I guess there is a specific kind of work to be done to understand and improve myself and I am yet to figure it out. Each of us is different, which makes this adventure even more difficult (and more exciting) but hey, I want to be my best, so I am here to listen, to study, to learn and to apply. Lunch time now, Bon Appetit everybody!

    • Raq, I love the comment: “I have experienced that bliss and that peace of mind that comes when I really care about the task I am doing”. Commitment means caring about something so much that you are willing to let go of other things to plave your undivided attention on that one thing. I had never thought of commitment as caring, I love that!

  27. Commitment has always been a struggle for me throughout my adult life because I have always been focused on what will be on the other side of the commitment. Questions always ran through my mind about if I would achieve my goal, if I would get to the path that I’ve been waiting for, if I would prove successful in my efforts. These thought processes led to so much defeat and frustration when I wouldn’t achieve what I thought would be waiting for me at the end of my commitment. Because of yoga, I am so grateful to have a new understanding of commitment–that I can commit to something, that I can change or act, in order to give myself peace and pleasure right now rather than worrying about the future. For me, commitment is now something more immediate and is related to the elements of my life that are the most important: my health, my family, my work, my yoga practice. I have learned that I don’t always need to look to the “end of the road” or what will come next. I’m now committed to myself and my personal growth on a day by day basis.

    • Amanda, you touch on a very important topic: expectations and focusing on the action rather than on the result. Later the sūtras get into the importance of detachment. Commitment is about being in the “now” and doing whatever you decide to do with everything that you have.

  28. Today is the first day after I graduated from Lucia’s 200 hour Happy Me Yoga Teacher Training. I feel different today. I know that today I am free of the commitment to finish my year long commitment to learn how to teach yoga. I have succeeded, I have climbed the mountain. and the rewards have been great. I have received blessings from not only our teacher and guide, Lucia, but from every woman who studied alongside me.

    I have decided to make another commitment though, that is to reread and comment on the Yoga Sutras one more time, one day at a time. I feel that NOW I can fully take in what I am reading on a deeper level. I am so excited to begin this journey anew. Commit, Connect, Act, I commit to continuing my yoga journey by steeping in the yoga sutras daily, on my own yet connected to others in order to understand more fully the Sutras and apply them to my life. This is Day 1, Again.

  29. This first sutra is so important to truly study and understand the depth of such a “small” statement. While few in words, the message is profound and encourages me to reflect on my commitments that I have made throughout life. I tend to over-commit myself to tasks, wanting to help as much as possible in as many ways as possible. The issue with this, however, is that I sometimes end up spreading myself too thin. My commitment is not fully made if I am not all there. Through my studies of Yoga, I have begun to realize this issue within myself and I am challenging myself to act in order to break old habits. Even within this assignment, I have put my phone away, closed out other programs on my computer, and turned off my music in order to truly focus on my thoughts and words that I share. While I understand that I want to help many, many people, I also now realize that I can be much more effective if I commit myself to one task at a time. Through this choice, I can develop a strong and purposeful connection with something else and act in a way that will encourage change to come.

  30. This first sutra is so important to truly study and understand the depth of such a “small” statement. While few in words, the message is profound and encourages me to reflect on my commitments that I have made throughout life. I tend to over-commit myself to tasks, wanting to help as much as possible in as many ways as possible. The issue with this, however, is that I sometimes end up spreading myself too thin. My commitment is not fully made if I am not all there. Through my studies of Yoga, I have begun to realize this issue within myself and I am challenging myself to act in order to break old habits. Even within this assignment, I have put my phone away, closed out other programs on my computer, and turned off my music in order to truly focus on my thoughts and words that I share. While I understand that I want to help many, many people, I also now realize that I can be much more effective if I commit myself to one task at a time. Through this choice, I can develop a strong and purposeful connection with something else and act in a way that will encourage change to come.

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  32. I am happy to be “here” again! I completed Yoga teacher training August 2015. The journey lead me to many changes and growth in my personal practice and life. I am now a part of teacher training again. Starting this journey again, revisiting the text and the sutras for a second time. I am recommitting to this journey, connecting from a different place, and with a new group of awesome ladies. I am excited to be a part of this training again.

  33. Commitment for me has always been about giving my energy and time to family, friends and non profit organizations. Reflecting on Sutra I.1, my thoughts turn to how those relationships have always come first…… unintentionally leaving my worn out SELF behind. So as I dip my toes into the waters of this Yoga teacher training, I commit to NOW float slowly down the ever expansive river of life, not swimming against the current, not standing on the banks analyzing the river, but getting in the boat and rowing.
    To tell you the truth it is kind of scary, I have always been afraid of water!!!
    I truly look forward to our time together as a group, and am so excited to be taking this journey with 5 beautiful women.

  34. Commitment is a big deal. You don’t see it much in the world today. So many people say they will do something and then when it becomes uncomfortable, they decide to do the easier thing. There is a no profit which I love called “because I said I would”. He wanted to pay tribute to his father who had passed and this is how he chose to do so. Because I said I would can be life changing. It feels so good to decide to do something then do the action to follow through. Such a sense of compliment is achieved. A wise man I know says “character is the act of following through long after the emotion has passed. There is so much to be said for that. I am excited to work on this topic in my life in general… Whether it be family, work, yoga or anything else that comes along. I can’t wit to experience the changes through this next phase of life.

  35. Commitment is scarce these days. Finding someone who actually does what they say they are going to do is rare. My favorite non profit as an organization called “because I said I would”. This young man wanted to do something in memory of his father who had taught him this lesson.. Many people stray from their plan once they become uncomfortable. It isn’t always easy to follow through! I’m on vacation right now with family. My nephew, Billy, is a wrestler. He is 12 years old and was asked to compete in a tournament in TN. He has to hold his weight where it is to wrestle in the group he qualified for. His parents gave him the option: watch what he eats, excercise daily & leave vacation early to compete, or not! He chose to do so. While we are eating and making pigs of ourselves, he made all smart choices. I was taken aback by his commitment. A wise man once said, “character is following through with the goal long after the emotion has passed”. Billy has character! I will take this lesson from my sweet nephew and hope to better myself.

  36. Love this! I have been so committed to my boss for the last 15 years that I have let everything else fall by the wayside – my children, my husband, myself! I am so grateful to be on this journey and to be learning how to refocus my commitment to myself, my husband, my children and everyone around me. How blessed am I to be on this journey with 5 amazing women and a truly committed teacher!

  37. For me to be committed is to be held accountable…and, well, accountability scares me. I am afraid of not living up to the standard of what I set out to do because it is always a far loftier goal than I can reach. I become exhausted and frustrated on the way and see my goal slipping…as it falls out of reach, I loose the motivation to continue because I see the failure and not the completion. So now, this behavior has embedded itself into a habit…a habit that has wired itself into a pattern of avoidance and denial.

    I know that vulnerability requires me to lower the fortress that surrounds me. Being humble is not weakness. I must become humble and seek forgiveness and forgive. I must become vulnerable to this commitment and put fort the trust in my teacher who guides me with the purest of intention and genuine love of my spirit. As I do this, I will transform, opening a new path and closing the old habit.

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